Wheat Field with Cypresses

Lorna Ritz

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

Lorna Ritz

Title

Heavy Heart, Sweet Blossoms

Medium

Oil on Canvas

Year

2018

L (in)

40

H (in)

50

Price

$4,500

Artwork Details

My paintings are like windows peering into space beyond their four edges. Plastic gravity pulls the viewer spatially inside the painting. I feel like I am at a construction site breathing life onto the canvas through a simultaneous building up and a tearing down of color. What is the distance between the forms, how do I get the space between them to move? The intervals are found through a process of elimination: I get rid of what does not enhance the whole, and add what does.
The general misunderstanding of a painting is due to missing it’s spiritual and technical qualities. If the observer’s eye is not trained to equate formal visual problems with those things, he/she will search for things which have little to do with the aesthetic content of a painting, looking for representational things instead of music-like relationships. My paintings are about the structural spaces that make up volumetric composition through the relationship of colors.

Artist Bio

Lorna Ritz was born in 1947 in Worcester, Massachusetts, back four generations. Her Mother was a concert pianist with whom she dueted Bach Sonatas from memory to be close to her Mother. Lorna was enrolled in art museum classes by her Mother when she was six because she was always drawing. She received a BFA in painting and sculpture from Pratt Institute in 1969 and an MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art in 1971, (in both as well). She taught at R.I. School of Design, Brown
University, University of Minnesota, and Dartmouth College, and was a continuous "Guest Critic" at the Vermont Studio Center from 1991–2013. She received a Community Residency, in the Dune Shacks, Provincetown, Massachusetts, to live in a shack without water or electricity abutting the vast ocean, right in the dunes. She has taught painting in Tecucigalpa, Honduras, Medellin, Colombia, Malta and the South of France, through the US Information Agency. Color, like music, is the universal language. When she worked with artists in the Townships of South Africa, it was through color that she communicated. She was a "Visiting-Artist-in-Residence" at American University, (D.C.), in Umbra, Italy, the New York Studio School, and the Institute for American Universities in Aix-en-Provence. Her paintings have been exhibited through the Art-in-Embassies Program in D.C. in Africa, Guatemala, Cape Verde, Caracas, and now Hong Kong, as well as at the Divinity Center at Yale University, Oresman Gallery in the Brown Fine Arts Center, Smith College, Bowery Gallery, NYC, Hillyer Gallery at Smith College, Fine Arts Center's ‘The Contemporary Art Museum” at the University of Massachusetts; Hood Museum at Dartmouth College, and the Fine Arts Center in Provincetown, MA., 1975. Collections include the Mead Art Museum, Amherst College, MA., Hale and Dorr Law Firm, (Boston), Bank of Boston, Johnson and Johnson, (N.J.), Anderson Museum of Contemporary Art, (N.M.), the Burnham Institute, (CA.), Veridex, (NJ), Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Childrens’ Hospital, Boston, Nataxis Global Asset Management, Boston, Cedars-Sinai Hospital in Los Angeles. She was awarded the Esther & Adolph Gottlieb Foundation Individual Support Grant, received the Pollock-Krasner Grant Award, (three times), Kittredge Fund Grant from Harvard University; Puffin Foundation Grant to work with prisoners, George Sugarman Foundation Grant Award, an Artists’ Fellowship, NYC, Haven Foundation Award, Maine, Artist’s Resource Trust, Berkshire Taconic
Community Foundation. She is a third generation abstract expressionist-impressionist painter, who studied with a student of Hans Hofmann. How colors relate is everything: the color finds the light, creates the shape. The general misunderstanding of a painting is due to missing it’s spiritual and technical qualities. If the observer’s eye is not trained to equate formal visual problems with those things, he/she will search for things which have little to do with the aesthetic content of a painting, looking for representational things instead of music-like relationships. Her paintings are about the structural spaces that make up volumetric composition through the relationship of colors. Her painting process is unsettling, passionate, radical, and driven. Altogether, a body of paintings become like the movements of a symphony that take a year or more to fully realize. Each painting has immediacy to it, but takes time to complete; it’s her own personal paradox. The painting is the consequence of technique and skill brought about by the concept. That is how what ends up on her canvas gets said, and how the paintings come to be.





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Lorna Ritz

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Departing Day

Oil on Canvas

Heavy Heart, Sweet Blossoms

Oil on Canvas

Song Turned into Color

Oil on Canvas

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